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Caraway is a plant. People use the oil, fruit, and seeds as medicine.

Some people take caraway by mouth for indigestion (dyspepsia), irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), obesity, and other conditions, but there is no good scientific evidence to support any use.

In foods, caraway is used as a cooking spice.

In manufacturing, caraway oil is used to flavor some medications. It is also commonly used as a fragrance in toothpaste, soap, perfumes, and cosmetics.

Natural Medicines rates effectiveness based on scientific evidence according to the following scale: Effective, Likely Effective, Possibly Effective, Possibly Ineffective, Likely Ineffective, Ineffective, and Insufficient Evidence to Rate.

Caraway oil might improve digestion and relieve spasms in the stomach and intestines.

When taken by mouth: Caraway is LIKELY SAFE for most people in food amounts. Caraway is POSSIBLY SAFE for most people in medicinal amounts, short-term. Caraway oil can cause burping, heartburn, and nausea when used with peppermint oil.

When applied to the skin: Caraway is POSSIBLY SAFE for most people in medicinal amounts. It can cause skin rashes and itching in sensitive people.

Special Precautions & Warnings:

Pregnancy: Taking caraway by mouth in medicinal amounts is POSSIBLY UNSAFE during pregnancy. Caraway oil has been used to start menstruation, and this might cause a miscarriage. Not enough is known about the safety of applying caraway to the skin during pregnancy. Stay on the safe side and avoid use.

Breast-feeding: Not enough is known about the safety of taking caraway by mouth or applying it to the skin if you are breast-feeding. Stay on the safe side and avoid use.

Diabetes: There is a concern that caraway might lower blood sugar. If you have diabetes and use caraway, watch your blood sugar carefully. The dose of the medications you use for diabetes might need to be adjusted.

Too much iron in the body (hemochromatosis): Caraway extract might increase the absorption of iron. Overuse of caraway extract with iron supplements or iron-containing food might increase iron levels in the body. This may be a problem for people who already have too much iron in the body.

Surgery: Caraway might lower blood sugar levels. There is a concern that it might interfere with blood sugar control during and after surgery. Stop using caraway at least 2 weeks before a scheduled surgery.

Medications for diabetes (Antidiabetes drugs)

Interaction Rating=Moderate Be cautious with this combination.

Caraway might decrease blood sugar. Diabetes medications are also used to lower blood sugar. Taking caraway along with diabetes medications might cause your blood sugar to go too low. Monitor your blood sugar closely. The dose of your diabetes medication might need to be changed.
Some medications used for diabetes include glimepiride (Amaryl), glyburide (DiaBeta, Glynase PresTab, Micronase), insulin, pioglitazone (Actos), rosiglitazone (Avandia), chlorpropamide (Diabinese), glipizide (Glucotrol), tolbutamide (Orinase), and others.
Before taking caraway, talk with your healthcare professional if you take any medications.

Herbs and supplements that might lower blood sugar: Caraway might lower blood sugar. Taking it with other natural products that have this same effect might lower blood sugar too much. These products include devil's claw, fenugreek, guar gum, Panax ginseng, and Siberian ginseng.
Herbs and supplements with sedative properties: Caraway might cause sleepiness. Using it along with other herbs or supplements that have this same effect might cause too much sleepiness. Some of these products include 5-HTP, calamus, California poppy, catnip, hops, Jamaican dogwood, kava, St. John's wort, skullcap, valerian, yerba mansa, and others.
Iron: Caraway extract might increase iron absorption. In theory, taking caraway with iron supplements might increase the risk of iron levels in the body becoming too high.

Iron-containing foods: Caraway extract might increase iron absorption. In theory, taking caraway with iron-containing foods might increase the risk of iron levels in the body becoming too high.

The appropriate dose of caraway depends on several factors such as the user's age, health, and several other conditions. At this time there is not enough scientific information to determine an appropriate range of doses for caraway. Keep in mind that natural products are not always necessarily safe and dosages can be important. Be sure to follow relevant directions on product labels and consult your pharmacist or physician or other healthcare professional before using.

Alcaravea, Anis Canadien, Anis des Prés, Anis des Vosges, Apium carvi, Carraway, Carum carvi, Carum velenovskyi, Carvi, Carvi Commun, Carvi Fructus, Cumin des Montagnes, Cumin des Prés, Faux Anis, Haravi, Jeera, Jira, Kala Jira, Karwiya, Krishan Jeeraka, Krishnajiraka, Kummel, Kummich, Roman Cumin, Semen Cumini Pratensis, Semences de Carvi, Shahijra, Shiajira, Wiesen-Feldkummel, Wild Cumin.

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