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Carrot is a plant. The leaves and the part that grows underground (carrot root) are used for food. The part that grows underground is also used for medicine.

Carrot root is used for Vitamin A deficiency. It is also used to prevent cancer, and for digestive health, obesity, other nutrient deficiencies, and other conditions, but there is no good scientific evidence to support these other uses.

In foods, carrot roots can be eaten raw, boiled, fried, or steamed. Carrot root can be eaten alone or added to cakes, puddings, jams, or preserves. Carrot root can also be prepared as a juice. Carrot leaves can be eaten raw or cooked.

Natural Medicines rates effectiveness based on scientific evidence according to the following scale: Effective, Likely Effective, Possibly Effective, Possibly Ineffective, Likely Ineffective, Ineffective, and Insufficient Evidence to Rate.

Carrot contains a chemical called beta-carotene. Beta-carotene might act as an antioxidant and help to prevent cancer. Carrot also contains dietary fiber, which might improve stomach and intestine conditions such as diarrhea or constipation.

When taken by mouth: Carrot is LIKELY SAFE when eaten as a food. Carrot is POSSIBLY SAFE when taken in the larger amounts used as medicine for up to 4 weeks. Consuming carrot in amounts much larger than those found in the typical diet for several weeks might cause the skin to turn yellow.

When applied to the skin: There isn't enough reliable information to know if carrot is safe or what the side effects might be. Some people are allergic to carrot when applied to the skin.

Special Precautions & Warnings:

Pregnancy and breast-feeding: Carrot is LIKELY SAFE when eaten as a food if you are pregnant or breast-feeding. However, there isn't enough reliable information to know if carrot is safe to use as medicine when pregnant or breast-feeding. Stay on the safe side and stick to food amounts.

Children: Carrot is LIKELY SAFE when eaten as a food. But it is POSSIBLY UNSAFE to give large amounts of carrot juice to infants and young children. Large amounts of carrot juice might cause the skin to yellow and the teeth to decay.

Allergy to celery and related plants: Carrot may cause an allergic reaction in people who are allergic to birch, mugwort, spices, ivy, parsley, celery, and related plants. This has been called the "celery-carrot-mugwort-spice syndrome."

There are no known interactions with medications. Before taking this product, talk with your health professional if you take any medications.

Iron: Eating carrot might increase iron levels in the body. Eating carrot and taking iron supplements might increase the effects and side effects of iron.

Iron-containing foods: Eating carrot might increase iron levels in the body. Eating carrot and along with other iron-containing foods might increase iron levels too much.

The following doses have been studied in scientific research in adults:

ADULTS

BY MOUTH:

  • For vitamin A deficiency: Eating 100 grams of grated carrots daily for 60 days has been used.
CHILDREN

BY MOUTH:
  • For vitamin A deficiency: Eating one spoonful of carrot jam daily for 10 weeks has been used.

Carota, Carotte, Cenoura, Danggeun, Daucus carota subsp. sativus, Gajar, Gelbe Rube, Hongdangmu, Hu Luo Bo, Karotte, Mohre, Mohrrube, Ninjin, Zanahoria.

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