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Ceylon cinnamon is the powdered bark from a tropical evergreen tree. People use the bark to make medicine.

Ceylon cinnamon is used for indigestion (dyspepsia), diarrhea, diabetes, obesity, and other conditions, but there is no good scientific evidence to support these uses.

In foods, cinnamon is used as a spice and flavoring agent.

In manufacturing, cinnamon oil is used in small amounts in toothpaste, mouthwashes, gargles, lotions, liniments, soaps, detergents, pharmaceutical products, and cosmetics.

Natural Medicines rates effectiveness based on scientific evidence according to the following scale: Effective, Likely Effective, Possibly Effective, Possibly Ineffective, Likely Ineffective, Ineffective, and Insufficient Evidence to Rate.
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  • Diabetes.  Most research shows that oral Ceylon cinnamon does not benefit patients with type 2 diabetes, although there is weak evidence that it might have modest benefit in patients who have poorly controlled diabetes despite treatment with antidiabetes drugs.
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  • Obesity.  Preliminary clinical research suggests that oral Ceylon cinnamon does not help with weight loss.
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Info

The oils found in Ceylon cinnamon are thought to reduce spasms, reduce gas (flatulence), and fight bacteria and fungi. Chemicals in Ceylon cinnamon might work like insulin to lower blood sugar. However, these effects are thought to be fairly weak.

When taken by mouth: Ceylon cinnamon is LIKELY SAFE when used in food amounts as a spice or flavoring. It is POSSIBLY SAFE when taken by mouth as a medicine. Ceylon cinnamon has been safely used in doses of 0.5-3 grams daily for up to 6 months. But Ceylon cinnamon is POSSIBLY UNSAFE when taken in larger amounts or when used long-term. Taking cinnamon oil by mouth is also POSSIBLY UNSAFE. The oil can be irritating to the skin and mucous membranes, including the stomach, intestine, and urinary tract. It can cause side effects such as diarrhea, vomiting, dizziness, drowsiness, and others.

Special Precautions & Warnings:

Pregnancy: Consuming Ceylon cinnamon is LIKELY SAFE when taken in food amounts during pregnancy. Ceylon cinnamon is LIKELY UNSAFE when taken in amounts greater than those found in foods during pregnancy. Stay on the safe side and stick to food amounts.

Breast-feeding: Ceylon cinnamon is LIKELY SAFE when taken in food amounts during breast-feeding. Not enough is known about the safety of taking larger amounts. Stay on the safe side and stick to food amounts.

Surgery: Ceylon cinnamon can affect blood pressure and blood sugar levels and might interfere with blood pressure and blood sugar control during and after surgery. Stop taking cinnamon at least 2 weeks before a scheduled surgery.

Medications for diabetes (Antidiabetes drugs)

Interaction Rating=Moderate Be cautious with this combination.

Cinnamon bark might decrease blood sugar. Diabetes medications are also used to lower blood sugar. Taking cinnamon bark along with diabetes medications might cause your blood sugar to go too low. Monitor your blood sugar closely. The dose of your diabetes medication might need to be changed.

Some medications used for diabetes include glimepiride (Amaryl), glyburide (DiaBeta, Glynase PresTab, Micronase), insulin, pioglitazone (Actos), rosiglitazone (Avandia), chlorpropamide (Diabinese), glipizide (Glucotrol), tolbutamide (Orinase), and others.

Herbs and supplements that might lower blood pressure: Ceylon cinnamon might lower blood pressure. Using it along with other herbs and supplements that have this same effect might increase the risk of blood pressure dropping too low in some people. Some of these products include andrographis, casein peptides, cat's claw, coenzyme Q10, fish oil, L-arginine, lyceum, stinging nettle, theanine, and others.
Herbs and supplements that might lower blood sugar: Ceylon cinnamon might lower blood sugar levels. Using it along with other herbs and supplements that might lower blood sugar could make your blood sugar level too low. Some herbs and supplements that might lower blood sugar include alpha-lipoic acid, bitter melon, chromium, devil's claw, fenugreek, garlic, guar gum, horse chestnut, Panax ginseng, psyllium, Siberian ginseng, and others.

There are no known interactions with foods.

The appropriate dose of Ceylon cinnamon depends on several factors such as the user's age, health, and several other conditions. At this time there is not enough scientific information to determine an appropriate range of doses for Ceylon cinnamon. Keep in mind that natural products are not always necessarily safe and dosages can be important. Be sure to follow relevant directions on product labels and consult your pharmacist or physician or other healthcare professional before using.

Batavia Cassia, Batavia Cinnamon, Canela, Canelero de Ceilán, Cannelier de Ceylan, Cannelle de Ceylan, Cannelle de Saïgon, Cannelle du Sri Lanka, Ceylonzimt, Ceylonzimtbaum, Cinnamomum verum, Cinnamomum zeylanicum, Cinnamon Bark, Corteza de Canela, Dalchini, Écorce de Cannelle, Echter Ceylonzimt, Laurus cinnamomum, Madagascar Cinnamon, Saigon Cassia, Saigon Cinnamon, Sri Lanka Cinnamon, Thwak, True Cinnamon, Tvak, Xi Lan Rou Gui, Zimtbaum.

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