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Gamma-linolenic acid (GLA) is a fatty substance. It's found in various plant seed oils such as borage oil and evening primrose oil. People use it as medicine.

People use GLA for conditions such as nerve pain in people with diabetes (diabetic neuropathy), eczema (atopic dermatitis), arthritis, high blood pressure, and other conditions, but there is no good scientific evidence to support most of these uses.

GLA is an omega-6 fatty acid. The body converts GLA to substances that reduce inflammation and cell growth.

When taken by mouth: GLA is POSSIBLY SAFE for most adults when taken in a dose of up to 2.8 grams daily for up to a year. It can cause some gastrointestinal side effects, such as soft stools, diarrhea, belching, and gas. It can also make blood take longer to clot.

Special Precautions & Warnings:

Pregnancy and breast-feeding: There isn't enough reliable information to know if GLA is safe to use when pregnant or breast-feeding. Stay on the safe side and avoid use.

Bleeding disorders: GLA might slow blood clotting. There is some concern that it might increase the risk of bruising and bleeding in people with bleeding disorders.

Surgery: Since GLA might slow blood clotting, there is concern that it might increase the risk of extra bleeding during and after surgery. Stop taking gamma linolenic acid at least 2 weeks before a scheduled surgery.

Medications that slow blood clotting (Anticoagulant / Antiplatelet drugs)

Interaction Rating=Moderate Be cautious with this combination.

Gamma linolenic acid might slow blood clotting. Taking gamma linolenic acid along with medications that also slow clotting might increase the chances of bruising and bleeding.

Some medications that slow blood clotting include aspirin, clopidogrel (Plavix), diclofenac (Voltaren, Cataflam, others), ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin, others), naproxen (Anaprox, Naprosyn, others), dalteparin (Fragmin), enoxaparin (Lovenox), heparin, warfarin (Coumadin), and others.

Phenothiazines

Interaction Rating=Moderate Be cautious with this combination.

Taking gamma linolenic acid with phenothiazines might increase the risk of having a seizure in some people.

Some phenothiazines include chlorpromazine (Thorazine), fluphenazine (Prolixin), trifluoperazine (Stelazine), thioridazine (Mellaril), and others.

Herbs and supplements that might slow blood clotting: GLA might slow blood clotting. Using it along with other herbs or supplements that also slow blood clotting might increase the risk of bruising or bleeding. Some of these herbs include angelica, clove, danshen, garlic, ginger, ginkgo, Panax ginseng, and others.

There are no known interactions with foods.

The following doses have been studied in scientific research:

BY MOUTH:

  • For nerve pain in people with diabetes (diabetic neuropathy): 360 to 480 mg of GLA per day has been used.

Acide Gammalinolénique, Acide Gamma-Linolénique, Ácido Gama Linolénico, AGL, Gamolenic Acid, GLA, Gammalinolenic Acid, Gamma Linolenic Acid, (Z,Z,Z)-Octadeca-6,9,12-trienoic acid.

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