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Sorrel is a plant. People use the above ground parts for medicine.

People take sorrel in combination with other ingredients for swelling (inflammation) of the nasal cavity and sinuses (rhinosinusitis), and for swelling (inflammation) of the main airways in the lung (bronchitis). But there is no good scientific evidence to support these uses.

Sorrel is also used as an ingredient in sauces and soups.

Natural Medicines rates effectiveness based on scientific evidence according to the following scale: Effective, Likely Effective, Possibly Effective, Possibly Ineffective, Likely Ineffective, Ineffective, and Insufficient Evidence to Rate.

Sorrel contains tannins, which have a drying effect to reduce mucous production.

When taken by mouth: Sorrel is POSSIBLY SAFE for most people when consumed in food amounts. It is also POSSIBLY SAFE to take sorrel in medicinal amounts as part of certain combination products. These include a specific product that contains gentian root, European elder flower, verbena, and cowslip flower (Sinupret, SinuComp), as well as a specific product that contains burdock root, Indian rhubarb, and slippery elm bark (Essiac). These combinations can cause upset stomach. In larger doses, sorrel can cause damage to the kidneys, liver, and digestive organs.

Sorrel is POSSIBLY UNSAFE when taken in large amounts, since it might increase the risk of developing kidney stones.

Special Precautions & Warnings:

Pregnancy and breast-feeding: Sorrel is POSSIBLY UNSAFE when taken by mouth in large amounts during pregnancy. Although unlikely, taking sorrel as part of a combination product (Sinupret) during pregnancy might increase the risk of birth defects. There isn't enough reliable information to know if sorrel is safe to use when breast-feeding. Stay on the safe side and avoid use.

Children: Sorrel is POSSIBLY UNSAFE in children when taken by mouth in large amounts. Sorrel contains oxalic acid. There is concern because a four-year-old child died after eating rhubarb leaves, which also contain oxalic acid.

Kidney disease: Large amounts of sorrel might increase the risk of kidney stones. Don't use sorrel without a healthcare professional's advice if you have ever had or are at risk of getting kidney stones.

Surgery: Sorrel can slow blood clotting. There is concern that it might cause extra bleeding during and after surgery. Stop using sorrel at least 2 weeks before a scheduled surgery.

There are no known interactions with medications. Before taking this product, talk with your health professional if you take any medications.

Calcium: Using sorrel along with calcium might decrease the absorption of calcium. Sorrel contains oxalate, which can bind with minerals in the intestine and keep them from being absorbed.
Herbs and supplements that might slow blood clotting: Sorrel may slow blood clotting. Taking it along with other herbs that also slow clotting might increase the chances of bruising and bleeding. Some herbs that can slow blood clotting include angelica, clove, danshen, garlic, ginger, ginkgo, Panax ginseng, horse chestnut, red clover, turmeric, and others.
Iron: Using sorrel along with iron might decrease the absorption of iron. Sorrel contains oxalate, which can bind with minerals in the intestine and keep them from being absorbed.
Zinc: Using sorrel along with zinc might decrease the absorption of zinc. Sorrel contains oxalate, which can bind with minerals in the intestine and keep them from being absorbed.

Calcium-containing foods: Using sorrel along with foods that contain calcium might decrease absorption of the calcium. Sorrel contains oxalate, which can bind to calcium in the intestine and keep it from being absorbed.
Iron-containing foods: Using sorrel along with foods that contain iron might decrease absorption of the iron. Sorrel contains oxalate, which can bind to iron in the intestine and keep it from being absorbed.
Zinc-containing foods: Using sorrel along with foods that contain zinc might decrease absorption of the zinc. Sorrel contains oxalate, which can bind to zinc in the intestine and keep it from being absorbed.

The following doses have been studied in scientific research:

BY MOUTH:

  • Swelling (inflammation) of the nasal cavity and sinuses (rhinosinusitis): A specific combination product containing 36 mg of sorrel, 12 mg of gentian root, and 36 mg each of European elder flower, verbena, and cowslip flower has been taken three times daily for up to 14 days.

Acedera, Acedera Común, Azeda-Brava, Common Sorrel, Field Sorrel, Garden Sorrel, Oseille, Oseille Commune, Oseille des Champs, Petite Oseille, Petite Oseille des Brebis, Red Sorrel, Rumex acetosa, Rumex acetosella, Sheep's Sorrel, Sorrel Dock, Sour Dock, Surette, Vignette, Vinette, Wiesensauerampfer.

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