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Tyrosine is a type of amino acid, which are the building blocks of protein. The body makes tyrosine from another amino acid called phenylalanine.

In the diet, tyrosine can be eaten in dairy products, meats, fish, eggs, nuts, beans, oats, and wheat. The body uses tyrosine to make chemical messengers that are involved in conditions affecting the brain, such as mental alertness.

People most commonly use tyrosine in protein supplements for an inherited disorder called phenylketonuria (PKU). It is also used for alcohol use disorder, cocaine dependence, and memory and thinking skills, but there is no good scientific evidence to support most of these uses.

NatMed Pro rates effectiveness based on scientific evidence according to the following scale: Effective, Likely Effective, Possibly Effective, Possibly Ineffective, Likely Ineffective, Ineffective, and Insufficient Evidence to Rate.
  • Phenylketonuria (PKU).  Oral tyrosine as a component of medical foods is recommended in people with PKU, a disorder in which phenylalanine cannot be endogenously metabolized into tyrosine.
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  • Cognitive function.  Oral tyrosine might improve cognitive function, particularly in patients exposed to stressors such as excessive cold, noise, or sleep deprivation.
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  • Memory.  Taking tyrosine orally seems to improve memory in patients exposed to stressors such as cold or those having to complete multiple tasks at once.
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When taken by mouth: Tyrosine is commonly consumed in foods. Tyrosine is possibly safe when taken as a medicine, short-term. It seems to be safe when taken in doses up to 150 mg/kg daily for up to 3 months. Some people experience side effects such as nausea, headache, fatigue, and heartburn.

When applied to the skin: Tyrosine is possibly safe when applied to the skin.

Special Precautions & Warnings:

Pregnancy and breast-feeding: There isn't enough reliable information to know if tyrosine is safe to use when pregnant or breast-feeding. Stay on the safe side and stick to food amounts.

Thyroid disorders: The body uses tyrosine to make thyroxine, a thyroid hormone. Taking extra tyrosine might increase thyroxine levels too much. This could make hyperthyroidism and Grave's disease worse. If you have a thyroid disorder, don't take tyrosine supplements.

Levodopa

Interaction Rating=Moderate Be cautious with this combination.

Tyrosine might decrease how much levodopa the body absorbs. By decreasing how much levodopa the body absorbs, tyrosine might decrease the effects of levodopa. Do not take tyrosine and levodopa at the same time.

Thyroid hormone

Interaction Rating=Moderate Be cautious with this combination.

The body naturally produces thyroid hormones. Tyrosine might increase how much thyroid hormone the body produces. Taking tyrosine with thyroid hormone pills might cause there to be too much thyroid hormone. This could increase the effects and side effects of thyroid hormones.

There are no known interactions with herbs and supplements.

There are no known interactions with foods.

In the diet, tyrosine is found in dairy, meats, fish, eggs, nuts, beans, oats, and wheat. In supplements, tyrosine has most often been used by adults in doses of 100-300 mg/kg by mouth daily. Speak with a healthcare provider to find out what dose might be best for a specific condition.

2-Acetylamino-3-(4-Hydroxyphenyl)-Propanoic Acid, Acetyl-L-Tyrosine, Acétyl-L-Tyrosine, L-Tyrosine, N-Acetyl L-Tyrosine, N-Acetyl-L-Tyrosine, N-Acétyl L-Tyrosine, N-Acetyl-Tyrosine, N-Acétyl-Tyrosine, Tirosina, Tyr, Tyrosinum, 2-amino-3-(4-hydroxyphenyl)propionic acid.

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